That bloody bandwagon

Hello my Freaky Darlings,

What I’m about to write is probably going to piss off a few people, but fuck it. I’m going to say it anyway. You are more than welcome to disagree.

You’ve probably all noticed the latest must have thing for all writers to have these days is a newsletter. If you haven’t noticed you’ve probably been living under a rock. You may want to crawl back under that rock until this latest phase ends.

Somewhere along the line an industrious author declared that the latest and greatest marketing tool is the NEWSLETTER and now it seems everyone is jumping on the bandwagon and if you don’t, most writers look at you like you’re nuts and say, “What do you mean you don’t have one!”

As a result every author and their cat is trying to get their readers to subscribe to the latest marketing trend. Every time you click on an author’s website or blog an annoying box pops up that asks you to subscribe. In an already pretty busy day, you first have to fill in your email address etc before you can get to the post you were actually there to read. Thankfully there’s that lovely little X in the top right hand corner that I rather enjoy clicking while I mumble “Fuck Off,” and then continue to read the post that I was interested in in the first place. But while I read it I’m slightly annoyed with the author.

At first it didn’t really bug me, I even subscribed to a couple, got a few free books that I still haven’t read. But now every time I click on an author’s website there’s that fucking box demanding that I sign up. And then there are the messages being deposited in my inbox. I now just hit the delete button. Don’t even get me started on the emails demanding to know if I’ve read that free book yet and why I haven’t left a review on Amazon for it.

I get that there are some authors who genuinely see the newsletter as a way to say thank you to their fans and who want to make it an epic experience for their readers. A way to give back for the support they’ve experienced. If you’re one of those authors then good for you. But unfortunately that doesn’t seem to be the majority.

There are now so many authors jumping onto the Newsletter bandwagon, and doing it badly, that’s it’s lost its whole reason for existing. It’s lost its power and has become spam. It’s now like those authors on Twitter and Facebook shouting “buy my book.” Instead of doing it on Facebook and Twitter they’re now trying to do it in my inbox and I’m sorry but to that I say Fuck Off!

I have enough emails to deal with every day. I don’t need any more spam.

Besides, my readers can already subscribe to my blog and there’s plenty of free stuff to read here, I don’t need to now also bombard them with a newsletter as well. It’s just over kill.

How about instead of jumping on the bandwagon and doing what everyone else is doing, we try to figure out something else. Something different. Something that works just for you. Something that makes you unique. I know that’s what I’m going to try. I haven’t got a clue what that is yet, but it’s certainly not going to be what everyone else is doing just because everyone else is telling me I have to do it.

13 Questions with Mercedes M. Yardley

Hello my Freaky Darlings,

Today we have Mercedes M. Yardley in the interrogation seat.

Mercedes Aurthor pic

Mercedes M. Yardley is a dark fantasist who wears red lipstick and poisonous flowers in her hair.  She was a contributing editor for Shock Totem Magazine and currently works with Gamut, a new neo-noir magazine. Mercedes is the author of many diverse works, including Beautiful Sorrows, Apocalyptic Montessa and Nuclear Lulu: A Tale of Atomic Love, Pretty Little Dead Girls, and the BONE ANGEL trilogy. She recently won the Bram Stoker Award for her story Little Dead Red.  Mercedes lives and works in Las Vegas, and you can reach her at www.abrokenlaptop.com.

You can also stalk Mercedes on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

  1. What drives you to write? 

MMY: “Drives” is the right word. I don’t simply write for fun or because it’s a cheery little thing to do. I write because I’m compelled to. It’s how I figure things out and learn what I’m really thinking. I tried no to write for years, getting “real” jobs and trying to be an adult. It was a horrible time. It stole my soul away. I’m a writer to my very core. 

  1. What attracted you to writing horror? 

Mercedes Dead RedMMY: I’ve always been a dark little girl. I think horror is delicious and a healthy way to explore your fears in a safe environment. When the book closes or the lights come up, you ultimately get to go home and crawl into your warm bed. You felt that emotion, that thrill and excitement, with no harm to you. Horror is a way to live life fully without harm.

  1. Who are your favourite horror writers? 

MMY: I love Joyce Carol Oates. I love Shirley Jackson. I was a big fan of Stephen King growing up, because he can handle a large cast of characters deftly and beautifully.  There are some fantastic new writers, as well. I’ve enjoyed everything I’ve read by Michaelbrent Collings, Bracken MacLeod, and Lee Thompson. 

  1. Which horror novels do you think every horror fan should read? 

MMY: I’d suggest starting with the classics. Read Frankenstein. Read The Haunting of Hill House. Everyone should read The Silence of the Lambs and also Lord of the Flies at least once. 

  1. Ebooks or paperback?

MMY: I’m in the unpopular minority here. I prefer ebooks, simply because my family of five people, two rabbits, a crotchety turtle, and ephemeral visiting stray cat live in a house the size of a shoebox. I have a shelf of books I truly love, mostly signed, but other than that, I read ebooks or pass my paperbacks along. I love the feel of a paperback. I love the smell of one. But practicality has to rule sometimes. 

  1. What would make you pick up a novel by a new author? 

MMY: I’m attracted to anything that says “ghostly” or “serial killer” or “chickens.” I’ll look at novels due to word-of-mouth, but then I find that I’m horribly disappointed in them. I like to find things on my own and form my own opinions. Great covers help. 

  1. Who is your favourite fictional character? 

MMY: I adore Hannibal Lecter. I find him beautifully complex. Despite his savagery and Mercedes Dead Girlsbloodlust, he is still elegant and has intricate rules that he follows. That juxtaposition and depth of character is something unusual. 

  1. Do you plot your stories or does it just unfold before your eyes? 

MMY: Oh my goodness, I am the very antithesis of a plotter. I can’t do it because it feels like the story has already been told, and then I’ve lost in interest in it. I enjoy sitting down and seeing what happens at the keyboard. It keeps everything fresh and new for me as a writer. If the author is bored, how on earth is the reader going to be interested? Every day is an adventure at the computer. 

  1. Do your characters take on a life of their own and do things you didn’t plan?

MMY: They really do. If you develop a character well enough, they’re going to have their own innate personalities and boundaries. A kind, generous character wouldn’t suddenly stab somebody to death without good reason. It isn’t in their nature, and you can’t force them to do that unless there’s an extenuating circumstance. It’s a very cool and humbling thing to see that you’re trying to prod your character into an inorganic direction for them, and it doesn’t work. It’s only when you sit back and stay true to them that the story writes itself. 

  1. Do you listen to music when you write or do you need silence?

MMY: I prefer silence, but I’ll use music to block out other noise. In that case, it has to be something I’ve never heard before or something without lyrics, because otherwise I’ll sing along. 

  1. Do you do a lot of research for your stories? 

MMY: I try not to drown in research. I do enough to get by, but many of my stories play with magical realism, where things Just Are. That aspect allows me to get away with the ethereality of the story without tethering it too closely to reality. I research enough that I hopefully don’t embarrass myself, but that’s about it. 

  1. Facebook or Twitter?

MMY: Facebook all the way. Twitter is basically the comments section of the Internet, and Mercedes Namelessnobody wants that.

  1. What really pisses you off about writing?

MMY: Writing can be terribly lonely. It needs to be done in solitude. Even if I’m in the kitchen with the kiddos and even have one on my lap while writing, I can’t be connected to my children. I’m inside my head. Preferably, I’m thinking about my work alone. I’m typing alone. I’m revising alone. The other day I was at a speaking engagement and somebody asked my nine-year-old what she thought about her mom being an author. She said, “She never has time to play with me. She’s always at the computer.” That hurt my soul. Writing takes time, effort, consistency, and discipline. It’s hard. And when we do put in the work to create something lovely, something that takes our breath away and makes us whole, it steals time from the other wonderful parts of our lives. Is it worth it? Yes, within reason. I’m still struggling with balance.

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Have you read any of her books? I have to say I love her covers and can’t wait to get my grubby little paws on a copy of three of her books.

Remember to hit that subscribe button to keep up with all the news, reviews, and interviews. And feel free to leave a comment or three. It’s always nice to hear from you guys.

 

To page or not to page

Hello my Freaky Darlings,

For a long time I debated whether or not to start my own author fan page on Facebook. There were many reasons why I thought the Facebook page was a bad idea. For one thing I thought it was pretty egotistical for me to have one. It’s not like I’m this world famous, best-selling, author with millions of fans. And then there was the fear aspect. Who would want to like my page? As I said, I’m not a world famous author with millions of fans. What if nobody hit that like button? What if I ended up looking like a complete idiot? And then there was the laziness aspect. I would have to do double the work. I already have a personal profile with the follow button switched on and I can decide who sees what on my profile page. I have over 2000 “friends” and a couple hundred followers. So why would I need a professional author page?

Well … because I’m a professional author, that’s why.

The Facebook pages come with certain handy functionality that you don’t have with a normal profile page. There’s the insights section that tells you in great detail what’s going on with your page with these nifty little graphs that allow you to track which posts work and which don’t. You can also track how similar pages are doing and compare what and how they’re doing with your own performance. What you do with that information is of course entirely up to you. You can use it strategically or not.

There are also the video and notes sections, which I’ve noticed many authors don’t utilise as much as they could. Not that I’m an expert, mind you. This is just an observation.

Once people are on Facebook they’re sometimes reluctant to click through to another site, so you can use the notes sections for excerpts from your books etc (that’s what I use it for any way). And the videos section can be used for book trailers, author readings, or whatever else you want to use. Remember, people are visual and they also want to see and hear their favourite authors. Most people have voyeuristic tendencies. I know I do. They want to have a glimpse into what authors do. A behind the scenes look. The videos section gives you that opportunity. Plus you have control of what you share with your audience.

Another button that I’ve noticed some authors not using is the call to action at the top of the page. You can decide whether your fans can subscribe to your newsletter or go through to a page where they can buy your books. The subscribe button seems to be the favourite one amongst many authors. I personally use it to send fans to my Amazon author page where they can shop for my books. It’s entirely up to you where you want them to go. But I’ve noticed that some authors haven’t set it up, which I don’t understand. Why wouldn’t you take advantage of something that useful?

If you want to see who’s doing their Author Page right, have a look at Author Rachel Morgan’s page. That woman knows what she’s doing.

The other rather handy thing with having an author page is that I get to spam it with all the stuff about my books and my writing to my heart’s content and nobody can give me shit about it because that’s exactly why it’s there and why people have hit that like button. They’ve hit it because they want to know about my books and my writing. Facebook also apparently objects to you using your profile page like a business thing. That being said you also have to strike a balance between interacting with your audience and spamming them day and night with stuff about your book. Once they’ve hot the like button you don’t want them to hit the unlike button. So once again the rule of “Don’t be a douche” applies.

Which brings me to another point. Writing is a business! We as authors whether we have a publisher or are going it alone have to approach our writing as a business. I don’t know about you, but I would like to earn enough money from my writing to be able to pay my bills. And having an author page allows me to conduct business. I can now advertise and reach an audience that I couldn’t do with my normal profile. Does it cost money? Yes. But as I said this is a business and sometimes you have to put a little cash in to get a lot of money back. You also get to decide on what your budget is for advertising and what you want to advertise on Facebook. You can advertise your page, or your website, or boost any of your posts, but you have to design them according to Facebooks specs. This is something I’m still figuring out how to do.

The fact is that as an author I have to use all promotional and advertising tools I have at my disposal in order to reach a wider audience. My Facebook page allows me to do this. It also lets me engage with that audience on a more personal level about my books and not just about coffee and cats without feeling guilty for sharing stuff about my books.

So … are you an author? Have you set up an author page? Or are you a reader? Have you liked your favourite author’s page? Have you liked mine yet? If not please go and do so here: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorJoanDeLaHaye/

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13 Questions with Kenneth W. Cain

Hello my Freaky Darlings,

Today I have Kenneth W. Cain in the interrogation seat.

Kenneth W Cain author pic

Kenneth W. Cain is the author of The Saga Of I trilogy (These Trespasses, Grave Revelations, and Reckoning), United State of the Dead, and two acclaimed short story collections: These Old Tales and Fresh Cut Tales. His short stories have been published, and are forthcoming, in several anthologies and publications. He lives in Chester County, Pennsylvania with his wife and two children.

You can stalk him on his website, Facebook, and on his Amazon author page.

  1.  What drives you to write?

I’ve experienced terribly realistic nightmares as far back as I can remember. At some point in my teens I started jotting them down on a napkin, a scrap of paper, or a sticky note. Nowadays they often end up in my cellphone notes app. Eventually those notes transformed into something more; a need to dissect my dreams. As this need grew, I began taking notes on every day life, as well. Someone who sees a woman’s child slip at a beach only to get swept away in the surf, might not see much more than a mother rushing to help her child back to their feet. I see the woman who hesitates, and I wonder what’s going through her mind in that split second of time. Eventually I found myself needing an explanation. This is what I think drives me, a need to explain the terrible, so it isn’t so horrible anymore. It’s a therapy of sorts, purging my soul, and being able to reflect on the prevailing good (most of the time).

  1. What attracted you to writing horror?

Kenneth W Cain - DeadCivilWarCoverAs a teen I discovered a collection of Writer’s Digest books on my parents shelves. Not all of the stories appealed to me, but one author in particular captured my heart. Upon reading Edgar Allan Poe for the first time, I found myself hooked. I made my way through those books, hoping to discover more short stories like that first one. Soon after I started visiting this local used-book store that kept all their horror books in the basement. I used to spend hours down there, reading and selecting my next book. I’d visit that bookstore at the end of each semester of college to trade in my school textbooks for horror books. It greatly saddened me the day that store closed. Anyway, those initial discoveries planted the seeds of my love for a frightening story.

  1. Who are your favourite horror writers?

Obviously Stephen King. His son, Joe Hill writes beautiful tales. Richard Matheson, and Jack Ketchum, of course. I’ve been listening to some of Jonathan Maberry’s audiobooks lately and enjoying those. I also like Dean Koontz, Clive Barker, Poe, so many others I’ve read in various short story anthologies (I used to devour those when I was younger). Though more fantasy, I love some of Ken Lui’s short stories. Damien Angelica Walters, too, who has such a creepy tone in her stories. Every year I discover someone new, and quite often multiple someones.

  1. Which horror novels do you think every horror fan should read?

My favourite is Joe Hill’s Heart-Shaped Box, so that’s where I would start. King’s IT is also a favourite, but I also enjoyed Bag of Bones. Ketchum’s Off Season comes right at you from the beginning. Definitely some Poe, too. I think short story anthologies (and even collections to a degree) serve a greater purpose here, though, as they allow a reader to sample many different writing styles all in one book.

  1. Ebooks or paperback?

I’m in the middle in regards to this argument. There’s nothing like holding a good paperback in your hands. The smell of the pages, the feel of it; this all brings back such good memories. But I’m often reading on my iPhone or iPad, or even on the computer. I also listen to quite a few audioboks, too.

  1. What would make you pick up a novel by a new author?

I think the old tried and true cover/title apply in most cases. That’s what everyone sees first. All of these revised King covers that are overly simplified don’t grab me much. I’m a visual person, so I want to see something hauntingly inviting, a horrific composition that tells a story. That’s the first hook.

  1. Who is your favourite fictional character?Kenneth W Cain - Fresh Cut Tales Cover-Digital

I hate to make this interview sound like it’s all King/Hill, because it isn’t. Still, I’d have to say Ig from Joe Hill’s Horns. Something about him always grabbed me. Same with my wife, as we listened to the audiobook together. Shortly after we finished we adopted a dog and named him Iggy because of that character.

  1. Do you plot your stories or does it just unfold before your eyes?

I think it’s become rather cliché to say this, but I see a movie in my head. At times, I’m walking through the scene, becoming part of the story. In other instances I’m looking down at my characters, doing my best to describe what I’m seeing as the plot unfolds. While I may have an idea as to how things might unfold, I let my characters tell the story. I want to let them live and breathe, choose on their own, which often leads to surprises.

  1. Do your characters take on a life of their own and do things you didn’t plan?

Yes, even when I have a solid idea on an ending they might throw a wrench into my plans and ruin everything. Such was the case with young Millicent, who just popped into my novella Lifeblood unexpectedly. She changed everything in that particular case.

  1. Do you listen to music when you write or do you need silence?

No one day is the same for me. One day I might jam out to Metallica. The next it might be Pink Floyd or Sinatra or another band. Other days it’s a complete mix of music styles, and other times I need absolute quiet. Occasionally I turn on the MLB channel while I write or listen to a Podcast. I do the latter more often these days, where I’m listening to a podcast or audiobook. It’s like I can write and absorb the audio at the same time. My brain just sort of makes it work somehow.

  1. Do you do a lot of research for your stories?

Kenneth W Cain book coverWhen the story necessitates I’ll do whatever research is needed to make things as real as possible. That’s what you want after all, to plop your readers down into what feels realistic, where they can become part of the story instead of just being a reader. That’s difficult to achieve, so you need to utilise every skill at your disposal. I think this is where the whole “write what you know” originated, as I’ll often hit upon things I know quite well.  But it’s also fun to write what you don’t know, and challenge yourself.

  1. Facebook or Twitter?

I try to avoid being on one more than the other, as a writer needs to maintain several social media platforms. I do, however, tend to respond quicker on Facebook.

  1. What really pisses you off about writing?

Wow, okay. This is a tough question. I guess for me it’s that I’m struggling to write that one story, what I often refer to friends as my “Pop Art” story or my “Paper Menagerie” story.  If you’ve read either of those stories, you know what I mean. They’re excellent, stand-out stories that will make you rethink why you ever got into writing in the first place. I’m not referring to winning a award, though that would be nice. I’m talking about writing that story which absolutely tears the heart out of everyone who reads it. That’s long been a passion of mine, but I feel like I’ve not yet achieved to that level.

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The Race: Cover Reveal

Hello my Freaky Darlings,

Today I’m really excited to show you the cover for my upcoming release – The Race.

Joanna Parypinski is drugged, kidnapped, and forced to fight for survival, for the entertainment of the world’s rich and depraved, as well as the chance to win her weight in gold.

In the race for her life, glory, and gold, Joanna must kill or be killed.

the-race-new-cover

So … what do you think?

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13 Questions with Kevin Lucia

Hello my Freaky Darlings,

Today I have Kevin Lucia in the interrogations seat.

Kevin Lucia author

Kevin Lucia is the Reviews Editor for Cemetery Dance Magazine and his column Horror 101 is featured quarterly in Lamplight Magazine. His short fiction has appeared in several anthologies, most recently with Neil Gaiman, Clive Barker, Peter Straub and Ramsey Campbell. He’s currently finishing his Creative Writing Masters Degree at Binghamton University, he teaches high school English and lives in Castle Creek, New York with his wife and children.His first short story collection, Things Slip Through was published November 2013, followed by Devourer of Souls in June 2014 and Through A Mirror, Darkly, June 2015. His next book, Mystery Road, is forthcoming from Cemetery Dance Publications.

You can stalk Kevin on his blog.

  1. What drives you to write?

Kevin Lucia Devourer of SoulsI’m a world-watcher. I look at the world around me, and I’m also naturally inquisitive, and I’m always asking questions – why did this happen, why did that person do such and such – and I’m always playing a big “what if” game in my head. What if that old abandoned middle school was haunted? What if a cab driver got lost on his route, and just ended up driving forever?  What about that creepy-looking school bus sitting on the side of the road, early in the morning? So I look at the things around me, I ask questions about them, or I say to myself “What if…” and that naturally leads to writing.

That, and I just like making stuff up. I see everything as a story, so I’m always telling stories in my head. Everybody has a story, and when I see people or things which interest me, I naturally want to make up their story.

  1. What attracted you to writing horror?

Growing up I read a lot of science fiction – Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Star Wars/Star Trek novels – so I began trying to write science fiction. Eventually, though, science fiction (for me, anyway) didn’t probe those  dark corners of our psyche like horror does. In Gary Braunbeck’s writing memoir, To Each Their Darkness, there’s a powerful passage about writing because we want to know why bad things happen. So, as an extended answer to question #1, I was drawn to horror because I see the world, and I wonder why horrible things happen, and I need to write about them. Sometimes I’m able to provide closure for myself. Sometimes, not so much.

When I was a junior in college, my friends and I went skiing on a lake where my best friend’s grandmother had a cabin.  Down the road an abandoned old Victorian farmhouse sat in the middle of a field. We’d go exploring and would always find strange occult stuff there…on the outskirts of a very “normal,” “All American” town. This spoke to me – that there’s plenty of “monsters” hiding in the dark corners of this world, and I no longer felt like writing about aliens from space.

Like so many other horror writers will likely say, it’s Stephen King’s fault. Growing up in the eighties, all I knew of horror were Nightmare on Elm Street and Friday the 13th movies, and I had no interest in slasher films, and I just assumed all horror was the same. Right about the time my friends and I discovered that old farmhouse, I read King for the first time – Desperation. Yes, it was horror, and there was bloodshed. But King’s characters were so fully-drawn and alive, and Desperation also offered this examination of God, and good and evil, and the power of love and sacrifice…it opened my mind to how powerful the horror genre really was.

  1. Who are your favourite horror writers?

Well of course, Stephen King, but also Peter Straub, Dean Koontz, Robert McCammon, the late Charles L. Grant and T. M. Wright, Norman Prentiss, Norman Partridge, Ramsey Campbell, Ronald Malfi, Rio Youers, Mary Sangiovanni, and though he’s not strictly horror, F. Paul Wilson. And also a ton of others I’m probably forgetting.

  1. Which horror novels do you think every horror fan should read?Kevin Lucia mirror-final-cover

Salem’s Lot and IT by Stephen King; lost boy, lost girl and in the night room by Peter Straub, The Nestling and Raven by Charles L. Grant,  Ghost of Manhattan by T. M. Wright, Thrall by Mary Sangiovanni, Floating Staircase and The Narrows, by Ronald Malfi, and – again, though not strictly horror – Boy’s Life, by Robert McCammon, along with his most recent horror novel, The Five.

  1. Ebooks or paperback?

Paperback. Really need that tactile sensation of turning pages.

  1. What would make you pick up a novel by a new author?

Endorsements by authors I trust – with whom I’ve had a good track record – and a publisher with whom I’ve also had a good experience. Also, I can usually tell in the first page or so if the prose is tight, neat, and quality.

  1. Who is your favourite fictional character?

A tie between Repairman Jack and Roland Deschain, definitely.

  1. Do you plot your stories or does it just unfold before your eyes?

It really depends on the story. The larger it is, the more plotting it needs. The only novel to date I’ve successfully finished, I plotted, and the novel I’m currently almost finished with, I also plotted. Short stories and novellas, however, tend to unravel and sprawl as I write, although there have been times when I felt the story was meandering, so I needed to stop writing, gather my thoughts, and jot down some notes about where the story needed to go, based on the characters needs and wants.

  1. Do your characters take on a life of their own and do things you didn’t plan?

All the time, even when I plot. That’s one of the best parts of writing, the surprising turns a story takes, or the unexpected choices your characters make.

  1. Do you listen to music when you write or do you need silence?

Kevin Lucia Mystery Road 2AWhen I was younger and in college, I listened to music – but I discovered a curious tendency to force the story to meet the constraints of the song. Since I started getting serious about writing, absolutely silence to write first drafts, though I can edit or type up     second drafts in the middle of a train wreck.

  1. Do you do a lot of research for your stories?

Only enough so it sounds logical. It’s too easy to get so caught up in the research, you forget you’re writing a fictional story, not a non-fiction analysis of something.

  1. Facebook or Twitter?

Facebook. Who can keep things under 140 characters, really? (IRONY)

  1. What really pisses you off about writing? 

Not a blessed thing. I’m utterly thankful for every word I write, and I really love every bit of it – thinking about possible stories, writing ideas down in notebooks, tinkering with ideas, writing, and then editing, which is probably my favourite part. That’s when you really get to see the story forming up. I don’t get frustrated when a story peters out; I just save it and move on to something, figuring I’ll come back to that story, eventually, and if I don’t ever come back to it? It wasn’t strong enough to be written in the first place.

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Back in Business

Hello my Freaky Darlings,

It’s been quite a busy week since I got my rights back for Shadows, Requiem in E Sharp, Oasis, and Burning. In that week I’ve managed to design new covers for Shadows, Oasis, and Burning, I’ve fixed a few typos, reformatted all four of them, and loaded them all up on Amazon KDP and Draft2Digital. They are now all once again available to download. Burning even made it to number 5 on the erotic horror section on Amazon.ca on Friday, which was a rather pleasant surprise, even if it didn’t stay up there for very long, it was still pretty fucking fantastic.

Thanks to Draft2Digital I also now have universal buy links for all the books so you can simply click on the links and decide which of the stores you want to buy from. My books are now available from pretty much every online bookstore. I think it’s pretty awesome.

Have a look for yourself by clicking on the below links:

Fury

Requiem in E Sharp

Shadows

Oasis

Burning

Next week I’ll be revealing the cover for my new novelette – The Race!

Remember to hit that subscribe button to keep up with all the news, reviews, and interviews. And feel free to leave a comment or three. It’s always nice to hear from you guys.